WAIST 03 EXHIBITING AT BASERANGE STORE

 
 
WAIST03




[My whole body as an ear by Maya Angelou.
Hearing colour. Tasting the symphony.
(Historic/Herstoric) Female gatherings.
The Mother: two heads and two hearts.
Milk and blood. Bread and water.]


We learn about ourselves by listening to others. We learn through
empathy. Humility. We learn what we would stand up for and what we
would not tolerate. Like a wordless baby with open eyes, the quietest
one at the table is often learning the most. I found a note in my pocket
the morning after a dinner party which read, "Why would you spend the
whole night talking about the things you already know?" Or rather, "Why
would you spend the whole night talking?" — My observation of the loudest
person in the room. His missed opportunity.


Writer and activist Maya Angelou has a saying, My whole body as an
ear. I like to imagine a giant ear with small feet and tiny hands, it's fleshy
lobes swinging as it walks. Not unlike an elephant’s. Big ears built for big
listeners.  

WAIST 03 - blurb
AnyOneGirl

 

To celebrate the launch of Anyonegirls’s WAIST 03 journal, Baserange Store Melbourne invite you to attend a special in store occasion.

Friday 19 October

4pm — 7pm
Baserange Store / No Order Market
187-193 Elizabeth St 
Level 1
Melbourne VIC 3000

 
 

The three artist prints below will be available to purchase through Baserange Store
The exhibition will run until 19 November.


Print 1 —  Heirloom  by Kayten Schmidt  "Some things I've inherited from my mother, or someone else's mother: a lamp which took me ten years to put with a shade, pearl earrings I cannot wear, a barrette originally from my grandmother whose hair was wispy and red, rocks from a sea I've never been to, and my crooked teeth." — Los Angeles-based artist Kayten Schmidt

Print 1 — Heirloom by Kayten Schmidt

"Some things I've inherited from my mother, or someone else's mother: a lamp which took me ten years to put with a shade, pearl earrings I cannot wear, a barrette originally from my grandmother whose hair was wispy and red, rocks from a sea I've never been to, and my crooked teeth." — Los Angeles-based artist Kayten Schmidt

 
Print 2 — Haumea by Ophelia Mikkelson Jones  In Hawaiian mythology Haumea is the goddess of childbirth and breast milk. Her name comes from Hanaumea meaning ‘the sacred birth’. In her legend it is told that her children were born from different parts of her body; that she birthed them from the palm of her hand, from her breast, her thigh and mouth. In iconography she is drawn or painted as a branch from the makalei tree, for she is the provider of sustenance and of the abundance needed for life to continue. Haumea is the mother of the renowned Pele (goddess of fire). Two of her other daughters are named Hi’iaka and Namaka. Hi’iaka means 'carried egg' referring to how a child is carried in pregnancy. Hi’iaka was born from her mother's palm inside an eggshell. Pele was given the egg to protect it and keep it warm, so she tucked it inside her armpit to keep it safe.

Print 2 — Haumea by Ophelia Mikkelson Jones

In Hawaiian mythology Haumea is the goddess of childbirth and breast
milk. Her name comes from Hanaumea meaning ‘the sacred birth’. In her
legend it is told that her children were born from different parts of her body;
that she birthed them from the palm of her hand, from her breast, her thigh
and mouth. In iconography she is drawn or painted as a branch from the
makalei tree, for she is the provider of sustenance and of the abundance
needed for life to continue.
Haumea is the mother of the renowned Pele (goddess of fire). Two of
her other daughters are named Hi’iaka and Namaka. Hi’iaka means 'carried
egg' referring to how a child is carried in pregnancy. Hi’iaka was born from
her mother's palm inside an eggshell. Pele was given the egg to protect it
and keep it warm, so she tucked it inside her armpit to keep it safe.

 
Print 3 — Alyeshmerni Shab e Sher by Clemence Poles + Mina Alyeshmerni  Photographs taken by Clemence Poles on the evening of Shabeh Sher 'Night of Poetry', at the family home of Mina Alyeshmerni. A tradition for generations and now an annual event, this series explores the gesture of hosting. Photographs by CL.MENCE POLES Conceived by MINA ALYESHMERNI

Print 3 — Alyeshmerni Shab e Sher by Clemence Poles + Mina Alyeshmerni

Photographs taken by Clemence Poles on the evening of Shabeh Sher 'Night
of Poetry', at the family home of Mina Alyeshmerni. A tradition for generations
and now an annual event, this series explores the gesture of hosting.
Photographs by CL.MENCE POLES
Conceived by MINA ALYESHMERNI